@ the Watrous Gallery | wisconsinacademy.org
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@ the Watrous Gallery

Andrew Redington, Roundabout, 2016. Sculpture, upcycled furniture, canvas,  70 by 70 by 30 inches.

Works by Robin Jebavy, Andrew Redington, Kyoung Ae Cho, Dakota Mace—all of whom should have shown at the gallery in late 2020-early 20201.

We’re absolutely on board with social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic. Even so, having to cancel our upcoming exhibitions is a major disappointment.

Interior James Watrous Gallery shot of the Collections & Connections exhibit

Building a specimen collection of plant, animal, and mineral resources was a matter of scientific interest and civic pride for the Wisconsin Academy’s 19th-century founders.

SV Medaris, G.O.S. Sow (detail). Hand-colored and reduction linocut, 8 x 10 inches.

When people think of Wisconsin, they think of farms. While farms both large and small dot our pastoral lanscapes, images of cows, barns, and cornfields are almost as ubiquitous.

Kerry-Harlan in her home studio, 2019. Photo by TJ Lambert/Stages Photography.

Whether she’s working in textile, collage, or photography, Sharon Kerry-Harlan makes art that buzzes with life and energy.

While scientists are tracking how Wisconsin’s plant communities are affected by climate change, artists, too, are observing and recording these changes.

Print and book maker Gaylord Schanilec in his Stockholm, Wisconsin studio.

Leap. It’s a word that artist and amateur naturalist Gaylord Schanilec uses frequently. In fact, Schanilec lives by the leap, often choosing artistic projects that require him to leap, both technically and conceptually.

Maggie Sasso, Semaphore-1-Y (from Y.H.W.), 2018. Handwoven cotton, mahogany, photographic documentation, 6 x 5 feet. Photo by Ben Dembroski.

Milwaukee-based artists Maggie Sasso and Nathaniel Stern use somewhat unconventional means to achieve their artistic ends.

Nathan Pearce • Untitled, Fairfield, Illinois, 2015. Copyright @ 2018 by Nathan Pearce. No reproduction without permission.

It’s taken me a while to realize it, but I’ve come to see that the Midwest is actually a perfect place to make a creative life.

Contemporary artists Helen Lee and Anne Kingsbury share an exploration of language as a central theme in their work.

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Wisconsin Academy Administrative Offices and Steenbock Gallery
1922 University Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53726
Phone: 608.733.6633

 

James Watrous Gallery of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
3rd Floor, Overture Center for the Arts
201 State Street
Madison, WI 53703
Phone: 608.733.6633 x25