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First Nations

Photo of first draft of US Constitution (made by First Nations)

Native systems of governance have faced intense challenges since European explorers first landed on these shores. While America's founding fathers took inspiration from Indigenous governments, the relationship between First Nations and the U.S.

Commercial Red Cliff Band fishermen like Junior Gurnoe (left) make their living from the waters of Lake Superior, the largest freshwater lake in the world. Photo courtesy of Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

A tribally owned and operated, zero-waste processing plant and retail shop opens on the Red Cliff Reservation just north of Bayfield.

Still from the presentation PowerPoint

Explore the conditions that gave rise to the Three Fires and Haudenosaunee confederacies and the lessons from their approaches to democratic principles.

Chef Elena Terry holds ancestral corn seeds. Photo by Tom Jones. No reproduction without permission.

For Chef Elena Terry, seeds represent both the past and the future of her people.

The 100,000 watt transmitter at WOJB broadcasts up to 80 miles. Photo courtesy of WOJB.

EDITOR'S NOTE: A Facebook message from Robert Albee, one of the early founders and organizers of WOJB–FM, brought to our attention a few errors and some elements of the radio station’s history that were missing from this article.

A recently published fourth collection, Palominos Near Tuba City, exemplifies the talents that have earned poet Denise Sweet considerable accolades.

Karen Ann Hoffman and Melanie Tallmadge Sainz share their perspective on supporting and promoting Native art and artists.

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Oneida artist Karen Ann Hoffman shares her knowledge of Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) raised beadwork with a group of apprentices and friends.

Beaders (l to r) Sandra Gauthier, Judith Jourdan, and Betty Willems at an Oneida Nation Arts Program workshop in 2013. Learn more about Oneida raised beadwork. Photo by Anne Pryor.

Raised beadwork has powerful cultural and historic meanings for the Oneida Nation.

Sandra Wescott Gauthier, My Backyard Birds Vase (detail), 2016. Glass beads, velvet, calico
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Showcasing the work of Wisconsin Oneida artists dedicated to the survival of one of their most important artistic traditions: Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) raised beadwork.

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REOPENING SEPT. 10, 2021
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