rural and folk arts | wisconsinacademy.org
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rural and folk arts

Sandra Wescott Gauthier, My Backyard Birds Vase (detail), 2016. Glass beads, velvet, calico
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Showcasing the work of Wisconsin Oneida artists dedicated to the survival of one of their most important artistic traditions: Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) raised beadwork.

Barbara Kettner, "Baling in August," 2015. Watercolor on paper.

The Wisconsin Regional Art Program (WRAP) has been changing the lives of Wisconsinites both rural and urban since 1940.

Explore the history and future of rural arts in Wisconsin with two of its greatest leaders: Maryo Gard Ewell and Helen Klebesadel.

Otto Rindlisbacher, folk singer and maker of stringed instruments, sitting in his shop holding a Hardanger fiddle. Photo ca. 1941 by folklorist Helene Stratman-Thomas. Reprinted by permission of the Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS: #25413).

Wisconsin Academy Fellow and folklorist James P. Leary guides us through a brief musical history of America’s Upper Midwest.

Art that interacts with and improves local communities is essential for maintaining—and improving—our quality of life in Wisconsin.

As a part of the Vital Skills exhibition at the James Watrous Gallery, exhibitions manager Jody Clowes convenes a conversation about the importance and relevance of preserving traditional skills and the best means for passing them on.

Artists and artisans who are preserving craft traditions like harness-making, decoy carving, blacksmithing, papermaking, weaving, and more carry knowledge accumulated from thousands of individuals over hundreds of years. And yet the accumulated knowledge and experience is surprisingly fragile.

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In this Academy Evening talk, panelists Donna Neuwirth and Jay Salinas of the Wormfarm Institute in Reedsburg, Wisconsin, and Mitch Menchaca of Americans for the Arts in Washington, DC, share perspectives on how to build community—especially in sm

Vital Skills builds on the current interest in community resilience and "re-skilling" by bringing together the work of people who are preserving traditional hand skills in Wisconsin.

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Wisconsin Academy Administrative Offices and Steenbock Gallery
1922 University Avenue
Madison, Wisconsin 53726
Phone: 608-263-1692

James Watrous Gallery of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
3rd Floor, Overture Center for the Arts
201 State Street
Madison, WI 53703
Phone: 608-265-2500