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wildlife conservation

In search of the once-extinct ivory-billed woodpecker.

David McLimans, Photo Credit: Patrick JB Flynn

GONE WILD: David McLimans will include a selection of the artist’s exquisite collages, gently humorous sculptures made with found materials, and sophisticated editorial illustrations.

Kathy Mehls is a retired high school guidance counselor from Chippewa Falls with an abiding love of birds and the outdoors.

By

On the occasion of the 2014 centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon, the Wisconsin Academy in partnership with the UW-Madison Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology explored the sobering story of the passenger pigeon and what it can

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Stanley A. Temple addresses the audience at the May 17, 2014, rededication of the Passenger Pigeon Monument at Wyalusing State Park. Temple, who led the effort to restore the 67-year old monument, has traveled the U.S. this year on a speaking tour in observance of the centenary of the extinction of the species.

A century after the bird’s extinction, conservation biologist and Academy Fellow Stanley A. Temple reminds us of the tragic story of the passenger pigeon.

White-nose syndrome, a bat disease that has spread to 23 states and killed up to five million bats since 2006, has been confirmed in Wisconsin, according to officials from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Infectious, deformed proteins called prions, known to cause chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer, can be taken up by plants such as alfalfa, corn, and tomatoes, according to new research from the National Wildlife Health Center

International Crane Foundation director and Academy Fellow George Archibald shares the stories of two populations of endangered Siberian Cranes, the white Asian cousin to our Whooping Cranes that were extirpated in Wisconsin by uncontrolled hunting.

While many of us would be inclined to run away from howls and yelps in the dark of night, others will spend a weekend studying these sounds during the Wolf Ecology Workshop at Treehaven, near Tomahawk.

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