Wisconsin People & Ideas – Fall 2018 | wisconsinacademy.org
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Wisconsin People & Ideas – Fall 2018

In this issue: We get the sweet and tart sides of cranberry growing and see photos of ourselves through the lens of an anti-portraiture photographer. A report from our Climate & Energy Initiative director Chelsea Chandler untangles the knot of how decisions are made surrounding electricity generation and transmission, and an article on UWM neuropsychologist Karyn Frick explores emerging research about the role estrogen plays in making and keeping our memories. We preview and upcoming Watrous Gallery show by Milwaukee artists Maggie Sasso and Nathaniel Stern, and share the 2nd place winning story from our 2018 contest. New Wisconsin poetry, book reviews, and a few happenings around the state round out our Fall 2018 issue. 

Volume: 
64
Issue Number: 
4

I was born into a family where the value of education was never questioned.

There are many places where people concerned about climate change can influence decisions surrounding electricity generation and transmission.

My wife once asked me why we print photo essays in the magazine. “Photos are everywhere online and everyone has a camera these days,” she said. “So, why bother?” 

Neuropsychologist Karyn Frick (center), postdoctoral fellow Wendy A. Koss (left), and graduate student Miranda Schwabe (right) in the Frick Lab at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee where they examine the complex relationship between hormones and memory in the brain. Photo by Troye Fox/UWM Photos.

Even as you read this sentence, a neurochemical process has begun that will determine how long you remember it—and this process happens differently in men than in women.

I like to think of my pursuit of a new kind of portraiture as a one-man crusade against those false 17th century court paintings and vainglorious images of business titans and corporate board members.

The town of Warrens in Monroe County, where these cranberries are being harvested, is the epicenter of cranberry production in Wisconsin. Every year the town celebrates the fall harvest with the Warrens Cranberry Festival, the largest cranberry-related arts and crafts festival in the United States. Photo courtesy of the Wisconsin State Cranberry Growers Association.

Everything you wanted to know and more about Wisconsin's state fruit: Vaccinium macrocarpon, better known as the large-fruited cranberry.

Maggie Sasso, Semaphore-1-Y (from Y.H.W.), 2018. Handwoven cotton, mahogany, photographic documentation, 6 x 5 feet. Photo by Ben Dembroski.

Milwaukee-based artists Maggie Sasso and Nathaniel Stern use somewhat unconventional means to achieve their artistic ends.

The day had wrapped us up in the blanket of its heat and refused to let us out, so much did it love us. Or maybe it was just lonely.

The New York Times critic A.O.

If you’re looking for sentimentality, you won’t find it in The Collected Stories of Carol Wobig.

Science writer and naturalist Scott Spoolman not only knows Wisconsin’s natural world well, his fine new book, Wisconsin State Parks: Extraordinary Stories of Geology and Natural History, reflects a lifetime spent in the woods and wilds o

Readers of Wisconsin People & Ideas need no elaborate introduction to writer/photographer/philosopher Richard Quinney, whose “Elegy for a Family Farm” was featured in the Winter 2018 issue.

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