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Wisconsin People & Ideas

Photo of author Chris Fink and his new book

“Who’s native and who’s been introduced?” asks a character in Chris Fink’s story, “The Bush Robin Sings.” The question in many ways fits tidily into the other stories within his new collection, Add Thi

Robert Gard visits with farmers on May 9, 1955. Gard traveled across the state (note the Wisconsin Idea Theater logo painted on the side of his truck) to promote and cultivate the theatrical arts in rural communities. Gard was a well-known figure in Wisconsin through his travels as well as his WHA-Radio program, and later WHA-TV program, “Wisconsin Is My Doorstep.”  UW Digital Collections/ID S15183

Imagine a theater whose walls are the boundaries of the State of Wisconsin, whose stage is as large as all the stages in the state put together.

Photo of the book reviewed along with author

A semi-fictional narrative about a slave settlement on Washington Island changes our understanding of Door County.

Cover of MAIDS and photo of the author, Abby Frucht

Maids is Abby Frucht’s first collection of poetry, and, as she says on her website, probably her last.

        Tell me     Grandfatherdid you ever        try to scrub outyour dark                   Mediterranean  skin          your Camelsoriginal     Napolitano     tongue

Karl Paul Link (right), the biochemist who discovered warfarin, and Mark A. Stahmann (left) perform a laboratory procedure at the Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station in 1949.  UW Digital Collections/ID S05108

The story of warfarin begins on a farm in St. Croix County with a dead cow, a milk can full of blood, and a hundred pounds of sweet clover.

Chef Elena Terry holds ancestral corn seeds. Photo by Tom Jones. No reproduction without permission.

For Chef Elena Terry, seeds represent both the past and the future of her people.

Photo of Jason A. Smith

At just over $10 billion, or 3.1% of Wisconsin’s GDP, you might think that the arts and culture sector is doing pretty darn well. It's not.

Photo of Jane Elder

One of the signs of good mental health is the ability to tolerate ambiguity.

Illustration by Laura Ovberg

My father eats braunschweiger sandwiches, thick ones he squeezes tight to hold together. He holds them with the hand that’s missing a finger.

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James Watrous Gallery of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters
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